Logo Assembly Logo Hemicycle

Opening of the sitting No 33

Debate under urgent procedure: Saving persons in the Mediterranean Sea: the need for an urgent answer

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:00:33

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

The meeting is open.

Proposed changes in the composition of committees have been published in document Commissions (2019) 07 Add. 3.

Are there any objections to these changes?

This is not the case, therefore they are adopted.

The agenda includes the presentation and discussion of the report by Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ on behalf of the Committee on Migration, Refugees and Displaced Persons, entitled "Saving persons in the Mediterranean Sea: the need for an urgent answer" ( document 14971).

In view of the large number of speakers on the list, I propose that we extend the debate on this report slightly and conclude this debate at 11:45 a.m. So, to conclude our meeting this morning at 12:15 p.m. instead of at 12 p.m. as originally planned. This means that we should be able hear the maximum interventions possible but also handle the many amendments that have been filed. Once the list of speakers finishes at 10:50 a.m. we will be able to hear the replies to the Committee and the vote necessary.

Mr President, you have a total of 13 minutes. You can divide it as you see fit between the presentation of your report and the response to the various interventions.

You have the floor.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

10:02:11

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madame Chair,

Merci, la Madame Président,

Chéres colleagues,

Even now, as we speak, many people are daring the waters of the Mediterranean to reach European shore. Regardless of their motivation for such a dangerous undertaking, whether they are running away from war, poverty, climate changes or something else, the fact remains that some of them will never reach the shore, as the salty waters of the Mediterranean will become their grave.

According to the records of IOM, UNHCR and Frontex, in the last six years, 18,888 people have lost their lives while trying to cross the Mediterranean. These figures are far from complete, and it is safe to assume that the real number is much, much higher. This is why we are debating this report in this august chamber, as we have debated similar reports on several occasions before, last time in June 2018. We have drawn attention to this problem time and time again. But now is not the time to draw attention, now it is time to demand action, hence the words in the title “the need for an urgent response.”

Let me underline, at this point, that the objective of the report is not to accuse anyone of anything, but rather to urge everybody to action. Not only Mediterranean countries, because this is not only their problem, but it is —or rather it should be— the problem of us all. I fully understand the pressure that Malta is under, as a small country with a large influx of migrants, as well as the positions of Italy and Spain, and I have personally witnessed the situation in Greece and Cyprus. I hope I can speak on behalf of all members present when I say that we highly appreciate all their efforts to save lives and uphold our principles. We see you and stand by you. A solution for responsibility sharing across the whole European Union is needed, but that is not the objective of this report, although we recognise it and call for it.

Operations like Mare Nostrum of Italian coast guards, Operation Sophia and Triton and efforts of coast guards of Malta, have saved thousands of lives. Nevertheless, despite these efforts, deaths by drowning continue. This is why I feel it is important to call for a launch of a new European Union rescue mission, especially since the previous ones have proven so effective. Furthermore, it is only natural to cooperate with other efforts aimed at saving lives as our main objective should be just that: to avoid the loss of lives. NGOs and other private initiatives, as well as all vessels enforcing international maritime law, have a role in this mission. Their role must be acknowledged and used in order to maximise efficiency of saving lives at sea.

Ladies and gentleman, we like to pride ourselves for our principles. We like to pride ourselves for respect for human rights. But, I ask you, what is a more basic human right than the right to live? Can we so easily chose to ignore that fundamental right? Talmud says: “he who saves one life, saves the world entire.” Colleagues, if we save a single life with this resolution, we have saved the world. Maybe not in its entirety, but definitely the world of the person saved, their hopes and dreams, their loves.

Dear friends, at the end of the day we shall all have to look ourselves in the mirror. It is impossible to outrun the reflection staring back at us, no matter how much we may try, it shall return to stare directly back into our eyes. I for one, would like to see in the eyes of that reflection that I made a difference today, that I saved the world, that because of me some dreams and hopes and loves still exist. I invite you to share this with me, and yes, you can do that, —you can— by supporting this resolution. I invite you to save the world, even if it is a small world, of a single person saved. That small, saved world gives august meaning to our work here, and all we stand for.

Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:07:32

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

You have a remaining time of 7 minutes and 40 seconds.

In the general debate, I call Ms ÆVARSDÓTTIR on behalf of the Socialist Group.

Thank you.

Ms Thorhildur Sunna ÆVARSDÓTTIR

Iceland, SOC, Spokesperson for the group 

10:07:52

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you Madam Chair.

Thousands of people have died in the Mediterranean in the past years. These are numbers that seem incomprehensible if you think about it. Europe allows thousands to drown at its shores. It doesn't really take any kind of care whatsoever to rescue them. It even rejects boats, that have taken it upon themselves to bring people to safety, from entering their shores. Where is the humanity in that? I would ask. Have we such small little souls, that we cannot help those who are literally drowning at our shores? That we cannot let them step foot on land, once they have been rescued by people who cannot stand by and watch? We make backroom deals about how we keep them away and how we send them back, never once truly looking in the mirror and asking where do these people come from, why are they coming, what is it that propels them to risk their lives to cross the ocean.

Maybe we have something to do with that, here on this continent. We and our allies, with our guns and our realpolitik. I think, in the refugee crisis, realpolitik has been guiding the minds and the mindset of our leaders. But there's nothing kind, there's nothing humane, there's nothing really genuine in any way behind talking about finding ways of getting people to stay in Libya.

Who is responsible for the situation in Libya? If I might ask. Should we not truly look into the mirror and wonder why are all of these people coming here, and stop looking at them as some sort of dirty secret problem that we have to fix somehow? Should we not start seeing it as our responsibility to bring people to safety? Seeing it as our responsibility to ensure that the drownings stop? One thousand people just this year already. One thousand people. That's our responsibility, just as much as anyone else's.

I say shame on us. Shame on the European Union. Shame on all of us for letting this happen. We have to react now. We should have done it years ago. But let us not continue this horrible way.

Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:11:01

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

I call Mr GALE, on behalf of the European Conservatives Group.

Sir Roger GALE

United Kingdom, EC, Spokesperson for the group 

10:11:09

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madame President. 

I had some difficulty in getting here. Forgive me while I catch my breath. But I have heard from the back the opening remarks and, you will understand Madame President, we regard this as a very serious issue indeed. What we are talking about, basically, is people's lives. And I think the fundamental principle that we all have to address is how the prevention of loss of life can be achieved. That is true, in the Mediterranean, and of course it's true in the English Channel.

We face now not dissimilar circumstances in the appalling human traffic between France and Britain, as we see in the human trafficking —and that is what it is— across the Mediterranean. And I think what we need to address, fundamentally, is the root cause. Is how we find a measure of humanely preventing this traffic from taking place. We —and I don't doubt the authorities in the Mediterranean— make a huge effort to try to save life, once that life is at risk. But that life should not be put at risk in the first place.

And that is the basis, I think, of the problem that we have to address. We know —we know from our domestic experience— the Italians, the Greeks, the whole of the shores of the Mediterranean understand, from their experience, the manner in which brutal people —and they are brutal people— dealing in traffic, in flesh, in livestock, if you will, send people out to sea —whether that's the Mediterranean Sea, whether it's English Channel— in totally unseaworthy craft, very often with insufficient fuel to go more than maybe a few miles, in a cynical knowledge that either somebody will pick those people up, or they'll die.

And so far as the perpetrators of these crimes are concerned —and they are crimes— that could not matter less. They've got their money. They've taken the cash. They move on to the next shipment of livestock. We cannot allow this to continue. So, what I would urge all colleagues, whatever your political persuasions are, however humane or otherwise you may feel about this, whatever our views on immigration and the control of immigration, maybe, we have to address ourselves here in this Assembly to the saving of life. That means a twin approach, certainly, but first of all, the prevention of the traffic, and then second, to do our utmost to make sure that people don't die.

Thank you, Madame President. 

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:14:18

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

I call Ms STIENEN, on behalf of the Liberal Group.

Ms Petra STIENEN

Netherlands, ALDE, Spokesperson for the group 

10:14:26

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Madam President,

Allow me to quote our Commissioner for Human Rights to the Council of Europe, Dunja Mijatović: "Whilst states have the right to control their borders and ensure security, they also have the duty to effectively protect the rights enshrined in maritime, Human Rights and refugee laws”. This quote is from her statements on June 2019, when she issued her recommendation Lives saved. Rights protected. Bridging the protection gap for refugees and migrants in the Mediterranean. I recommend this report to all of our colleagues. It has an excellent analysis and excellent recommendations. It is worth reading and implementing.

Our Group supports this call of the Commissioner of Human Rights, and the need expressed in the report of Mr Damogoj Kajdukovic, for an urgent response in saving lives in the Mediterranean Sea.

It is imperative that the Council of Europe States, the European Union and individual European states, find a way to effectively protect the lives of humans, be it refugees, asylum seekers or migrants, on land or at sea. The protection of human rights should always prevail over any political dilemma or uncertainty that the interaction of different legal regimes, policies and practices may cause.

Let me be clear. In this urgent debate we are discussing saving lives. The discussion about refugees and migrants is related, but not the topic of today. The ALDE group does have a few objections to some of the wording and recommendations in the report. We consider these as topics for further discussion in this Parliamentary Assembly. For example, on the implementation of the recommendation of the Commissioner of Human Rights.

This report is, as I said, about saving human lives. And the ALDE Group fully supports this indeed.

Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:16:34

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

The next speaker is Ms BRYNJÓLFSDÓTTIR, from the Group of the Unified European Left.

Ms Rósa Björk BRYNJÓLFSDÓTTIR

Iceland, UEL, Spokesperson for the group 

10:16:43

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Madame President, 

The journey across the Mediterranean Sea is treacherous at best, deadly at its worst. 

Hundreds of thousands have taken on this journey, to flee conflict and poverty in war-torn places, for the safety of Europe. Twenty thousand people have died on the perilous journey across the Mediterranean Sea during the last six years. Migrants and refugees, desperate to escape from wars, droughts, poverty and inequality, to a European shelter.

Many are coming from North Africa in rubber dinghies and wooden boats —women and children among them, many children on their own —unaccompanied, scared and vulnerable. And the death toll remains. We need to ask ourselves if the member states' policies are effective enough to cope with this challenge. The answer is no.

The scale of the problem is such, that we need to further action now. We must respect our international obligation and member states must coordinate their efforts to protect lives that can be lost at sea.

More countries must join the agreement of some EU member states on the relocation of people rescued by NGOs. We must stop the push-back policy that Europe has been running for the last years. We simply cannot, any longer, put the responsibility of refugees and migrants on others, and turn a blind eye to the problem.

We must open our ports, but we must put more effort on tackling the root of this all; tackling poverty and inequality, stop warfare and work decisively on peace-building in struggling countries. We must act more decisively on combating climate change, as it has become one of the causes of war and political instability. We must take responsibility and share this responsibility among us.

Greece cannot solve this alone, nor Spain, Turkey, Malta or others. Let's launch a new European rescue mission, let's take united action to stop trafficking in human beings, and combat people smuggling. Let's stop training, financing and equipping the so-called Libyan Coast Guard, without raising any questions. Let's allow NGOs to carry out their life-saving missions in the Mediterranean Sea, ensuring the captains of all vessels rescuing migrants and refugees in the Mediterranean, are able to disembark them in the nearest port of safety.

But let's remember that it is the duty of the states —not NGOs— not to let people drown in the Mediterranean.

We must solve this together. Let us stop the blaming game, we must act together now. Let's open our ports and, not least, let's open our hearts. But most importantly, we have a duty not to let people drown on our doorstep.

That must come to an end now. 

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:19:46

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

I give the floor to Ms BAKOYANNIS, on behalf of the EPP Group.

Ms Theodora BAKOYANNIS

Greece, EPP/CD, Spokesperson for the group 

10:19:52

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Dear colleagues,

Let me give you a little bit of the Greek experience.

The Greek experience is 800 people today, between eight o'clock in the morning and nine o'clock in the morning, arriving at the Greek island of Mitilini.

Before yesterday, a young mother 23 years old and her daughter of three years old drowned at a near island called Inusses. What does that mean? It means that thousands of people are coming again and trying to get to Europe. We had a crisis in 2015. I'm afraid we are in front of a new immigrant crisis now. This will continue. It will continue as long as traffickers are gaining a lot of money out of those desperate people.

Now, we not only need wishes, we need action. And their action can only be that there must be some very concrete agreements on how these people are getting into these lifeboats, which are death boats. Because these boats are made, for example in Turkey, there are whole industries building these boats. Single use boats and life vests, which cannot save the people. There must be some kind of agreement that this is a major crime. We cannot accept and just look at it and say "we must save the people". Believe me, the Greek navy and the Greek boats are doing this the whole day, 24 hours a day. We are having very little help from FRONTEX. We need a lot more help. But today, the major route is through the Aegean. A 115% increase in the last year. We need European help, but we also need some kind of decisions which must be implemented.

I understand that Turkey has nearly four million refugees today, but these refugees cannot be instrumentalised as pressure towards Europe, so that turkey does not make any kind of effort to stop them going to sea -if it isn't even facilitating it.

It is a very big problem. I don't believe that we can wait until January to re-discuss it, because trust me colleagues, if decisions are not made now, we will be in January facing, not thousand of deaths, but many many more dead people in the Mediterranean.

Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:23:13

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

Does the rapporteur wish to reply?

After the other speakers.

The next speaker is Mr CHENARD.

Mr Stefan SCHENNACH

Austria, SOC 

10:23:26

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madam President.

I too would like to congratulate the rapporteur on this report, and thank you with clear words.

First and foremost, it's about human lives, and then it's about other issues. The Mediterranean, a cradle of humanity, cradle of culture, the cradle of the most important, great religions, is today a mass grave. Just today, a report from the UN has been published; and it will also be debated in Brussels.

We cannot accept this mass grave, no matter in which part of the Mediterranean. Whether it's in the Aegean now, whether it's at the height of Italy or Malta, or at the Spanish coasts. That is why we must all work together. As I said in a preliminary interview, Mare Nostrum was a heroic action to save lives, to secure them. We have to look ahead, make sure there are safe routes so that people do not have to board such unseaworthy vessels to come to Europe.

We need safe routes to save people who are in danger of persecution, families that are about to die. We need less, I would say, unethical agreements, such as those we have with Turkey or Libya. Europe must create its own ways to enable people to arrive safely in Europe. Europe is big enough, and Europe, in its demographic winter, also has the need for people to come and join us, and become part of our community.

But we must stop these deaths in the Mediterranean. That is why we have to join forces. This is the responsibility of the European Union and the nation states, but NGOs are doing a heroic job. As I said once before, we should definitely propose captain Carola Rackete for the Václav Havel Prize, because what she has done, and the courage she has shown to save human lives, is heroic and deserves all our respect.

Thanks.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:26:27

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

The next speaker is Mr NÉMETH.

Mr Zsolt NÉMETH

Hungary, EPP/CD 

10:26:32

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Madame President,

Secretary General,

Dear colleagues,

I would like to express a grave concern about the large number of refugees who have left, who have lost their lives in the Mediterranean trying to reach Europe. In order to avoid the rising death by sea, we need to give urgent responses. I one hundred percent agree with that.

The transport alone, however, of the illegal migrants rescued in the Mediterranean to the EU will not stop this process, but generate further pull factors, creating more dangerous journeys. The process will only serve the interests of the smugglers, and definitely not the interests of those who spend enormous amounts on the perilous journey, but are not entitled to protection.

According to statistics, in the first instance, the recognition rate is 34% in the European Union's comprehensive approach. Do not import the problem, but to export the solution is needed. First of all, safe ports are needed for the successful establishment of disembarkation platforms. Thus, the European Union should support stability in North African countries, such as Libya.

In addition, the international community should provide assistance to the concerned countries in the region, to comply with their international obligations in the field of search and rescue mechanisms, as well as border protection. At the same time, capacity building and developing of reception conditions are necessary in the African host and transit countries. Therefore, I simply do not see why the report is intending to terminate the Libyan Coast Guard development project.

Finally, illegal migration through the Mediterranean is fuelled, basically, by instability in both Africa and the Middle East. The ongoing crisis in Syria fuels migration, therefore all relevant actors should intensify their efforts to end the crisis. Rehabilitation and long-term stabilisation are necessary to allow refugees and migrants to return to their homelands. Hungary takes its fair share through the Hungary Helps Programme, for example. It is the interest of Europe to address the root causes of illegal migration, so we can put an end to this phenomena, which only benefits those who exploit this situation; exploit for their narrow-minded business or political interest.

Thank you very much for your attention.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:29:28

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

I give the floor to Mr SCHWABE.

Mr Frank SCHWABE

Germany, SOC 

10:29:34

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Madame President,

Dear Colleagues,

Today is an urgent debate and indeed an urgent debate not about migration. You can talk about it many times, but today it is not about migration. Incidentally, there has always been migration, as we can see in many reports we make on minority rights, on language, on labor migration. Today, it is simply the question and the debate over how we deal with people who drown in the Mediterranean, who drown miserably. Whether we try to reach out to these people and simply preserve their lives, their naked lives and their dignity. This debate is an outcry of outrage over a real European shame. I believe that will happen in the future and we will look back historically and say that it is a European shame to let thousands, maybe tens of thousands of people drown on our doorstep in the Mediterranean. 928, these are the current official numbers. Maybe it is more. Alone this year.

That does not work, ladies and gentlemen. This report, for which I cordially thank Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ, says this should end immediately. Two things are necessary for that: on the one hand we have to recognize the non-governmental organizations, Mr Stefan SCHENNACH has mentioned some that save human lives, nothing but that and we should stop criminalization. They are the heroes of our time. It is the people who reach out to other people; what everybody would do. Even people who criticize that, I'm sure if they were there and if they were on the ship, you would rescue this people. I was on a ship in January: you would hold the hands of these people, you could not bear to let someone drown. That's why it's right and fortunate that there are now a couple of states that have set out to arrange a distribution mechanism for burden sharing, for these few hundred, maybe a few thousand people. That we agree on burden sharing means that people should be brought quickly to other states; that countries like Malta, which are really in a big difficulty, will be helped as well.

But what we need is the wish and the urgent request to the European Union –because the Council of Europe can not do it– is an inter state solution. It is the task of European states and at the end of the European Union to launch a inter-state rescue mission. We have already talked to President Macron about this. Chancellor Merkel has said that she wants to launch such an initiative at European level. And it is our organization, I think, that has to do everything we can to ensure that the European Union moves forward on this. We are talking about Memorandums of Understanding. If it is the case that the European Union has the capacity, and that we are the Human Rights organization of Europe, then we must ask and urge the EU to launch such a mission. That is why I ask for broad support for this motion.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:32:41

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

The next speaker is Ms MONTARULI.

Ms Augusta MONTARULI

Italy, EC 

10:32:47

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

I want to thank the rapporteur for the report itself, and for giving us an opportunity to reflect, once again, on the deaths in the Mediterranean.

The Mediterranean must return to being a sea without blood, because every time a person dies at sea, it is our civilization that is defeated. It is the opposition of civilization against barbarism, it is the opposition of the value of life against commodification and materialism. 

It seems completely simplistic to address this important and delicate subject, speaking only of rescues at sea, when the rescue should take place well before: before desperate people are put into the hands of traffickers, and before their hopes, their lives and their sensibilities are put into the hands of criminal organizations. It is there that we, the national countries, the European Union, all of us, have the responsibility to save, because everything that happens afterwards is a remedy that comes too late. Too late.

We should not accept, in the name of our humanity, that lives are put in insecure boats to face desperate journeys in our sea.

To avoid this, we must first undertake a relentless repression of criminal organizations. But, at the same time, we must all work together for a Mediterranean of peace, to solve the root causes which push people to cross the whole of Africa, and, yes, be subject to violence; I think of many women who are raped every day, or are subjected to forced labour, before being able to enter a boat and leave.

If we stop at the Mediterranean, we only clean our consciences. Perhaps, yes, an honour to a captain of any NGO can make us say that we are better than others. But beware: who grants them this honour? Countries that have denied their ports to these people.

I would have liked to hear more about how NGOs are not the solution to saving people at sea; because we, the States, are the solution to this terrible problem.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:35:51

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

The next speaker is Ms VERDIER-JOUCLAS.

Ms Marie-Christine VERDIER-JOUCLAS

France, ALDE 

10:35:55

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madam President.

I would like to thank and congratulate my colleague Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ for the work done on a hot topic, a dramatic subject and a subject on which we really must react now. Because, as has been said and repeated: it is about human lives.

This morning, in Committee, you quoted the President of the Republic Emmanuel MACRON who said: "When the migrants are on the boats, it is already too late". So we must act before reaching this stage. But it is not so simple and we must all here, firstly, be united in this fight against the smugglers, and then, manage to welcome them with dignity. Which we do not do today. It is our responsibility and our honour, and I am proud that France is the country that has welcomed the most migrants from boats of the Mediterranean. But we must do more.

However, I have several questions, Mr Rapporteur.

What mechanism could ensure no crimimal liability for NGOs working in the context of rescue operations at sea? A state/NGO protocol specific to each country, defining the framework for such operations? Granting NGOs the right to humanitarian intervention? Or something else?

With regard to your point 3, what are the obstacles currently observed to a more effective relocation of migrants, as you point out?

Finally, regarding hosting in the nearest ports, given their geographical proximity to the places of departure of migrants, these same ports are at risk of absorbing the majority of flows. So what are the possible European financing mechanisms to improve hosting in these ports, which we all want here?

Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:38:16

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

I give the floor to Mr ZRINZO AZZOPARDI.

Mr Stefan ZRINZO AZZOPARDI

Malta, SOC 

10:38:24

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Madam President.

Secretary General.

Colleagues,

This debate cannot be carried out without a correct assessment of the current situation in the Mediterranean.

And the reality is: scruple-less traffickers are making money by selling space on inadequate boats, and strand vulnerable migrants, who often can’t swim, in the Mediterranean Sea.

The number of persons attempting a crossing have been steadily increasing, thus the risk of more persons perishing at sea. Yet rescues have, and are being carried out, in the best way possible, according to international law and humanitarian obligations. But it’s only a few frontier countries, like my country Malta, a small island with a high population density, who are undertaking these rescues.

Only these frontier countries are currently shouldering all the responsibility to save migrants’ lives at sea. This is not fair. It feels like we have been left alone to deal with this, even though, particularly in the case of my country, we have limited resources. And we cannot wait any longer for the Dublin rules to be reformed.

So, in the meantime, the Maltese, Italian, German and French governments, together with the Finnish Presidency and European Commission, have prepared a draft ‘way forward’ to ease the pressure on front-line states that cannot cope. This plan will be discussed at next week’s JHA Council, in the hope of gaining wider Member State support and action.

On a daily basis, we are trying our best to face the realities. More than our best. In 2019, there were four times the amount of arrivals than in 2018. The situation is unsustainable.

Currently, there are concerns about the amount of stress our reception facilities are currently under. But with the size of our country and workforce, we are acting with great difficulty, and we cannot continue to carry this responsibility alone.

Rescuing should be done by a mix of properly equipped vessels, with trained staff, following a rotation system of disembarkation in safe ports. We need to tackle this in the correct manner. The way forward, in my opinion, cannot depend on rescues carried out by NGO vessels.

And, whilst each Member State must carry its responsibilities, we also need a long-term plan which includes a fully-equipped and functional Libyan Coastguard, even if we need to look into the way this coastguard would act. Action against traffickers is imperative. We must all express the need for a clear way forward to achieve a stable Libya.

The Malta Migration Meeting proposals must commence with immediate effect.

We must strive more together, to continue working towards a more permanent solution. The way forward is more collaboration between all European states. The frontier countries cannot be left alone any longer.

Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:41:45

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

I call Mr JALLOW.

Mr Momodou Malcolm JALLOW

Sweden, UEL 

10:41:52

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you very much.

Madam President,

This is an extremely important discussion. Today, we're going to hear people say we need equal sharing. Don't listen to it too much, because it's a distraction. We're going to hear people talking about how to attack the root causes of this problem. It is a distraction. We're going to hear people say we don't have resources and we need to assess the situation. It is a distraction.

Madam Chair, what we're discussing here today is how to stop people dying in the Mediterranean. That's what we're talking about. We're talking about an ardent situation, where people are drowning every single day. We sit here and we talk about how to have long-term plans, how to have long conferences and discussions, whilst people are drowning and dying every day. It's not acceptable.

We have to do away with the distractions, and talk about what we actually are supposed to talk about: people dying.

Madam Chair, it is said that already, over a thousand people have drowned just this year. In Europe, we have globalised capital because you can move capital from Africa to Europe without any problems, but we have no globalised Human Rights. If people want to move from Africa, from Syria or from the Middle East to Europe, it's a problem. We create barriers, externalised borders. We use taxpayer's money to pay criminals who capture, enslave and torture people in Libya. We pay them from Europe, with taxpayer's money. That is not acceptable. We need to speak about that, because that means we contribute to the situation that we see in Libya by giving them resources to torture and enslave black people. We've all seen this. It's not a secret.

Madam Chair, as a Member of this very important gathering, and also as a person of African descent, this is a very, very important topic for me to discuss, because it's very close to home.

Madam Chair we, cannot distract ourselves from the realities that are taking place in the Mediterranean today. That's why we should focus on the debate.

We should stop externalising borders. We should make sure that we stop criminalising voluntary rescuing missions. If we have failed in making sure that people are not dying, when ordinary citizens want to help out, and they voluntarily go to sea to search and rescue people, we cannot be criminalising them. We complain that we don't have the resources. Europe is one of the richest continents, and it is only a fraction of the refugees that come to Europe. Most of them are in poor countries. The poor countries are not complaining as much as Europe is complaining. This is not acceptable, Madam Chair.

We need to make sure that we live up to the obligations that we have when it comes to Human Rights standards. We need to make sure, Madam Chair, that people can have the right to come and apply for asylum, and run away from wars and conflicts that, most of the time, we are part in creating.

Thank you

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:45:08

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

I call Mr WHITFIELD.

Mr Martin WHITFIELD

United Kingdom, SOC 

10:45:14

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madame Chair.

And it's a great pleasure to discuss this today. Which is, perhaps, one of the most urgent things that's facing —not just Europe— but the world. And I complement the rapporteur and the staff in the preparation of the report.

The Mediterranean, at its deepest point 5 267 metres deep. It averages 1 500 metres. It covers 2.5 million kilometres squared. It has a temperature that ranges from 30 to 72 degrees, and is the largest enclosed sea in the world. It has 46 000 kilometres of coastline. It is a sea that sits in our combined memory, as part of the start of civilisation. It is the sea route that led to the development of Europe and of North Africa. And it sits on so many people's holiday postcards, but it is a sea that is full of death today. And that's why this urgent debate is so important.

We have heard about people, governments and organisations that want to widen the debate as to why people find themselves in that sea. But it is a long-standing and fundamental tradition of every seafarer that, when they go out to sea, if they see somebody in trouble, they go to help. They do it because they expect the same if their vessel is in trouble. It is not why they are at sea that leads to the question "should they be rescued?". It's not how much money they have. It's not how much problem they're going to cause.

The ancient people that stepped on boats and took to the sea, the people who took to the sea during war, the people who've taken to the sea to explore and trade, know that if they see somebody in trouble, they go to rescue. But only the Mediterranean has people who are not on that sea —politicians and governments— send instructions that, on this occasion, you are not to help, you are not to land. That is a disgrace. That is a disgrace for those people who are not at that sea.

Today, we have the opportunity, with this report, to send back the statement that we go back to the basic humanitarian demand, that if you see someone in trouble, if you see them drowning —be they child, woman, man— you put your arm over the side of that ship and you help. There are many answers to why the problem is occurring, but the problem is occurring today, and we can take a step, in this place today to speak, to the people of Europe and wider and say "enough is enough". The death in the Mediterranean must stop. 

Thank you. 

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:48:24

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

I call Ms GAFAROVA.

Ms Sahiba GAFAROVA

Azerbaijan, EC 

10:48:30

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you very much Ms President.

Ladies and gentlemen,

The issue we discuss today is extremely important. It is timely and needed. I would like to thank my colleague Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ for his work on this issue. As a former Chair of the Committee on Migration, Refugees and Displaced Persons I can say that Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ was extremely interested in working on these subjects, certain aspects of which he already addressed in the report he prepared in 2018 on the extraterritorial processing of asylum claims and the creation of safe refugee shelters abroad.

In this report the rapporteur presents a comprehensive overview of the situation with a focus on practices and particular problems in certain member states. It is clear that this report is motivated by the persisting tragedy still playing out in the Mediterranean Sea, with new deaths reported daily by the media and international organisations, and the continuing degradation of human lives through trafficking and smuggling.

It should be mentioned that our Assembly continues to be appalled by the high number of lives lost in the Mediterranean Sea by asylum seekers who are trying to reach Europe on makeshift boats. I support calls on member states to respect their international obligations that coordinate the efforts to protect lives at sea and to devote special attention to assistance for vulnerable migrants such as children women, disabled persons and those in need of particular medical or psychological support.

Ladies and gentlemen, it's well known that the movement of populations across the continent has sometimes signified invasion, confrontation and war. Unfortunately in our contemporary context, which combines economic stress and political doubt, the rise of extremist forces and the threat of an ecological meltdown there is a global tendency towards introspection and hostile nationalism based on a fear of foreign influences which might upturn traditions, burden struggling economies and challenge the fragile status quo.

Dear colleagues, it should be mentioned that one of the consequences of the present migration and refugee crisis is the growing influence of populist parties which very often use false arguments against migration. I think that it is our responsibility to provide our people with unbiased and objective information.

I agree with the rapporteur that laws, regulations, guidelines, best practices, initiatives and mechanisms for fulfilling the undisputable obligation to save lives at sea and to alleviate the hardships endured by those who leave their homes not by free will but by absolute necessity. These provisions must be taken into account and applied to ensure a greater respect for human rights and equality.

Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:51:47

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Mr FASSINO has the floor.

Mr Piero FASSINO

Italy, SOC 

10:51:56

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Mr. President.

I would like our debate not to be taken for granted, because I believe that no one in this forum disagrees with the fact that we must save lives and avoid, after 20,000 people have died in 6 years, other deaths. So it is clear that we must do everything to save human lives.

After that, I would like this Assembly to also be aware that there are a number of issues related to saving lives. Starting with the fact that, once you have saved human lives, you need to know where you take them, how you welcome them and who manages them.

From 2012 to 2016, 600,000 people landed on the Italian coasts. And not to come to Italy, but to Europe. Most European countries have refused to see this reality and accept a redistribution of these migrants.

So, you say here "save human lives", and then think that someone else is dealing with it. We must be honest and sincere among us. We save human lives and we must make sure, together, that we welcome and integrate them. This is my first consideration.

I come to the second one: most of those who arrive are not refugees in the strict sense. There are those who come from Syria or Libya, which are theatres of war and conflict, but we know that most of them are economic migrants.

So, here too, we must avoid the argument that we welcome refugees, but not economic migrants. I would like to point out that, from now until the end of this century, Europe will have 70 million fewer inhabitants based on the current birth rate dynamics, and, therefore, Europe needs an additional demographic contribution.

If it is true, as Macron said, that the humanitarian protection of refugees cannot be extended to any migrant —and it is true— there is also a corollary: alongside humanitarian protection, we must have a European strategy to understand how to regulate the flows of economic migrants.

Simply saying that we take one or the other is not an answer. It's hypocrisy.

Managing the migration issue is a serious matter. Everyone here was told to take responsibility.

Exactly: let us assume all the responsibilities. Thanks.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

10:54:57

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Mr FASSINO.

We must now interrupt the hearing of the speakers. Those who were present during the debate, were on the list and could not speak, can send their typed speech to the communication service for publication in the minutes. As far as possible, the speech must be submitted electronically.

Thank you.

I call on the Committee to reply. Mr HAJDUKOVIĆ, you have 7:40 minutes left, you have the floor.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

10:55:30

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madame Chair, 

First of all, allow me to start with thanks to all the countries, to all the NGOs, and to all of you personally who have contributed in saving lives and bringing attention to this very important topic. Danke, thank you, merci, grazie, spasiba, gracias, teşekkür, ευχαριστώ.

Thousands of people have died just here, just this year, as we have heard. And what President MACRON said, what we heard, is that when these people are on the boats, we have already failed. Our mission is to discourage the people to go on such a perilous journey. And I fully support the initiative that the interior ministers have reached in Malta, in late September, with initiative from France, Germany, Malta, Italy, Finland and, I hope —I strongly hope, and I say so in the report— that as many countries as possible, EU countries, will follow, will take the responsibility and will face what Mr Fassino said. This is not only the problem of Mediterranean states, this is a problem of us all.

And we should really stop the blaming game. I do say so. People must be saved. What will happen to these people later? How will they be processed? Whether they will apply for asylum and get it or not. We have debated that time and time again in this chamber, and in numerous other reports, but we should focus on this one, which means saving lives.

Now, I'm fully aware of the problem that Greece and Cyprus are facing. And I could probably talk for half an hour about it. I have seen it firsthand, and I really do salute the Greek State and Cypress for all that you are doing. And I do call for solidarity, which is crucial in this problem. We cannot let our friends in Cyprus, Greece, Malta, Italy and Spain handle this problem alone.

Ships that save people, or rather captains that save people, must not be prosecuted because they're just enforcing the international maritime law, which says that people in peril at sea must be saved. Being prosecuted for that, I mean it's appalling that we even have to debate about. That should go without saying. That also applies to private endeavours, such as NGOs, but also, we had instances that private yachts, or cruiser ships, saved people because it's their obligation. It's their human obligation, moral obligation and law obligation as well. And that is not something to prosecute them for.

Human trafficking gangs are an extreme problem, and we also debated about that problem here on numerous occasions. Maybe, the time is ripe for another report, another resolution, and another debate on the approaches on how to combat them. And I fully agree that it is an extreme problem, but again, not the topic of this report.

Now, when it comes to the questions I've been asked about NGOs, and how to regulate their role in this issue, I call your attention to the report I'm preparing, that deals with NGOs' rights and obligations assisting refugees in Europe. That will be an appropriate moment to debate all the issues pertaining to this particular issue. Also, I would like to encourage all members who can contribute their ideas or their suggestions —the report is still in the stage where I can intervene quite a lot in the text. You have it on the Extranet, you have it in the papers, those who are members of the Migrations Committee.

And, finally, I would like to reiterate what I said at the beginning. This report is about saving lives, just that. To say "just" is an understatement, because it is extremely important and, as Talmud said —and that is the quote I especially like—, ladies and gentlemen, let's save the world. Even if it's a small world of a single person, their loves, their hopes, their fears —if you wish. But if we succeed in saving a single life, with this resolution, then we give an august meaning to our work here, and it really makes sense that we are here, and the work we're doing.

Thank you. 

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:00:30

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, rapporteur.

I give the floor to the vice-chairman of the Committee.

Please, you must respect the order in this room and, in particular, the rapporteur of the Committee.

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:00:43

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madam President.

Dear colleagues,

First of all, I would like to congratulate the rapporteur for leading the preparation of this report in record time, and for presenting an excellent text which I hope will be supported by everyone today. I also thank the speakers and members of the Committee I represent.

We have heard in our Assembly this morning a lot of sincerity, a lot of emotion. We have also heard a certain admission of inefficiency in our action and our policies because, really, the problem is not solved.

I remind you that we met in this same hemicycle more than a year ago, in June 2018, to debate the exact same subject with urgency.

What has happened in the meantime? What did we manage to achieve?

We really did not solve the problem. Lives continue to be lost at sea. Men, women, children —who have not asked for a life in such situations— undertake a life-threatening journey and, if they do not die, they often suffer from ill-treatment and suffer in their flesh from the bad conditions they have to endure.

As the resolution says, as members here today have said, we have an absolute duty, a moral duty, to help those people. We must absolutely meet the obligations we have subscribed to.

We must respect the fundamental values to which our countries have adhered in the Council of Europe. Providing relief and assistance to people at risk is an absolute obligation for all our countries, for all of us.

Some initiatives today give some hope for more solidarity. They are mentioned in the resolution. We must support them and do everything possible in this area.

We have a duty to share responsibility for the rescue and the reception of these refugees. Let's take the word "urgency" from the title, letter by letter, take this debate very seriously, and act urgently today to resolve these tragedies that are not acceptable.

Thank you for your support of this resolution.

Mr Georgios KATROUGKALOS

Greece, UEL 

12:32:30

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

(Undelivered speech, Rules of Procedure Art. 31.2)

We are speaking today about the life of families, mothers and children drowned every year in the Mediterranean. Whether there are in their majority refugees or immigrants is a false question. Factually speaking, International Amnesty still considers the flows to be comprised mainly by refugees. Still, the question is mute, because it would not change our obligations towards these people, since rescue at sea is an obligation by international law, pushbacks are forbidden and all asylum applications must be examined on an individual basis.

How we are going to act is important for the life of all these innocent victims, but also for our identity, national and individual, for our soul and for the character of our European polities.

The front-line states should not be left alone to face the challenges of refugees and migration pressure. An efficient and solidary common European policy is the only solution, passing through the change of Dublin Regulation. As President Macron has said, even participation to the Schengen space should be dependent on the willingness of states to show solidarity and comply to the responsibilities stemming from international instruments and for EU law.

The situation in our part of Europe becomes urgent and tense. Although the toll of victims remains relatively lower than in other parts of the Mediterranean the number of arrivals is exploding. Greece has received in 2019 45.600 refugees and migrants out of a total of 77.400 in the whole Mediterranean. Only in September we had 10.258 arrivals. So, the eastern route, the Aegean route remains the most active one.

Why this rise of numbers? Beyond Root causes, like inequality and poverty, and geopolitical push factors, like the war in Syria, there is also a conjectural factor: the instrumentalization of migration by Turkey. Rise of flows toward Greece is a real barometer reflecting the fluctuation of tension between Turkey and Europe. Therefore, Turkey should abstain from similar practices, fully implement the EU-Turkey agreement and dismantle smuggler networks.

Dear colleagues, we should avoid the nationalist temptation of Europe Fortress and reaffirm the openness of our societies and commitment to fundamental European values and respect of human rights.

Ms Sabrina DE CARLO

Italy, NR 

12:32:31

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Speech not pronounced (Rules of Procedure, Art. 31.2), only available in italian

Mr Alberto RIBOLLA

Italy, NR 

12:32:32

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Speech not pronounced (Rules of Procedure, Art. 31.2), only available in Italian

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:03:05

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you. That concludes the general debate.

The Committee on Migration, Refugees and Displaced Persons has presented a draft resolution to which 30 amendments have been tabled.

We will move on to the consideration of this draft resolution contained in Document 14971, the amendments will be taken in the order in which they are set out in the text, as published in the compendium of amendments.

I remind speakers that the intervention time for each amendment is limited to 30 seconds. I ask that you scrupulously respect this time limit.

Amendment No. 17, Mr KLEINWAECHTER has the floor to support it.

Vote: Saving persons in the Mediterranean Sea: the need for an urgent answer

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:03:47

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Ms President.

It's a bit sad that you cut the speaker's list right before the speaker would have been in place for 13 amendments. But anyway, Amendment 17 seeks to replace the words "asylum seekers" with the word "migrants" because indeed most are actually not asylum seekers but migrants.

They may be asylum seekers or they may come for economic reasons, but we are mainly talking about migrants in the Mediterranean Sea and, therefore, it's more adequate to replace these words

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:04:17

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Does anyone wish to speak against the amendment?

Mr... Please, I'm sorry, I do not know your name.

Mr Georgios KATROUGKALOS

Greece, UEL 

11:04:32

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Madame, from the European Left.

This is factually incorrect. Amnesty International reconfirms that the basic profile of arrivals is still comprised of refugees. For instance, in Greece where we've had the highest rise, the vast majority of people coming are from Afghanistan and Syria.

Above all, this is not a relevant question. We're speaking about the lives of people. Flows are comprised both by asylum seekers, in their majority, and eventually immigrants, so we argue against the...

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:05:14

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Amendment No. 17.

We will now proceed to vote on Amendment No. 17.

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:05:17

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

The Committee accepts by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:05:20

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Amendment No. 17. We will now vote on Amendment No. 17.

The vote is open.

The vote is closed.

Amendment No. 17 is adopted.

Amendment No. 18.

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:05:53

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

There is a passage in paragraph 2 that talks about assuming responsibilities as member states. However, we cannot see any lack of responsibilities. All the European countries are bound by EU Treaties. They are bound by further treaties, so there is no lack of responsibility that we could criticise and should criticise and, therefore, this sentence should be taken out of paragraph No. 2.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:06:20

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Does anyone wish to speak against this?

Mr Rapporteur.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:06:24

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madame Chair. 

I am against this amendment because the call for accepting responsibilities and the necessary willingness to cooperate is extremely important, as we heard before from all the speakers. Even at the EU level, a new solution is being negotiated so I think it is extremely important to leave it in the report.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:06:45

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

 

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:06:46

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:06:48

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected.

We will now vote.

The vote is open.

The vote is closed.

Amendment No. 18 is rejected.

We will go now to Amendment No. 29, Mr KLEINWAECHTER.

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:07:15

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

The same as I said before: replacing "asylum seekers" with the word "migrants".

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:07:20

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

Is someone speaking against?

Mr rapporteur.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:07:24

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madame Chair.

I have to be against here because the sentence is about processing asylum claims, so to replace it with "migrants" would make it lose any sense.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:07:34

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:07:36

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:07:38

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

We will vote on Amendment No. 29.

The vote is open.

The vote is closed.

Amendment No. 29 is rejected. Amendment No. 19, Mr KLEINWAECHTER.

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:07:57

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, President.

The paragraph talks about the duty of states not to let people drown, but that's already fulfilled. We have the duty to rescue in international maritime law, so a state cannot let anyone drown and there is no way to do that.

We asked for a changing of this passage to uphold the rule of law despite severe migration pressures, because it's only the rule of law and really pushing for legal a framework that will regulate the things orderly and will actually contribute to saving lives.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:08:30

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you. The next speaker is Mr HAJDUKOVIĆ.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:08:34

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

I have to be against because states have the obligation under international law to carry out search and rescue operations in the territory of maritime borders.

It's the same thing with ambulances. If somebody is in the street and they are in need of urgent medical assistance the ambulance comes and helps the person. They don't ask him what their status is, whether they have applied for asylum or whether they have a passport. They help the person, they save a life, and this is about saving lives, so I'm against it.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:09:02

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:09:04

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:09:06

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We will now vote.

The vote is open.

The vote is closed.

The amendment is rejected.

On to Amendment No. 20.

If it is adopted, Amendment No. 12 will fall.

Mr KLEINWAECHTER.

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:09:28

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

Paragraph 4 talks about a continued denial of the basic human rights of migrants in the Mediterranean, which is not true. It's simply false. Any migrant has at all times the right to apply for a work visa; every migrant has the right to apply for a study visa; every migrant has the right to ask the country of destination to accept him as a potential immigrant. Therefore, it is simply wrong that any migrant would be deprived of basic human rights in the Mediterranean. We have to delete that.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:10:01

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

Anyone against the amendment, Mr HAJDUKOVIĆ?

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:10:05

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

As I said, what is a more basic human right than the right to live?

Article 2 of the European Convention of Human Rights protects the right to life and article 3 prohibits refoulement. Both rights have been at stake in several cases in this is why I'm against it.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:10:21

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:10:23

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:10:24

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We will put it to the vote.

The vote is open.

The vote is closed.

The amendment is rejected.

We therefore move on to Amendment No. 12. Amendment No. 12 is the subject of an oral sub-amendment by the Committee.

I give the floor to Mr MANIERO to support Amendment No. 12.

Mr Alvise MANIERO

Italy, NR 

11:10:55

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, President.

Declaring that we are in a systematic denial of human rights in the Mediterranean means not only ignoring the hundreds of thousands of lives that have been saved, but it means seeing only what is lacking in our work and not what is achieved daily, especially by the border countries, often in terrible solitude.

If we want to tackle this problem, we must start from reality; and reality is not what is written in this report, it is not just this.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:11:27

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

As I have told you, by the Committee on Migration, Refugees and Displaced Persons has referred to the Chair the following oral sub-amendment: in Amendment 12, after the words "paragraph 4", draft the end of the amendment, replace the words "in the face of denial" by the words "in the face of the challenge",

Pursuant to Rule 34.7 of the Rules of Procedure, the President may, exceptionally, declare an oral amendment or sub-amendment admissible if she considers that it is intended to provide clarification, to take account of new facts or to allow conciliation.

I think it is admissible.

Are there any objections to taking this oral sub-amendment into account?

Apparently not. So we will ...

Yes, sorry, Mr Fassino. Do you wish to defend the oral sub-amendment?

Mr Piero FASSINO

Italy, SOC 

11:12:27

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

No. No. I think the oral sub-amendment ...

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:12:30

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Do you oppose it?

In that case, at least ten representatives must rise to oppose the consideration of this oral sub-mendment.

If that is the case, we will not examine it, but there must be at least 10 members.

So, enough members have stood up. We do not pass this oral sub-amendment to the vote.

I would like to know if anyone is opposed to Amendment No. 12, as presented.

Mr HAJDUKOVIĆ.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:13:13

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Madame Chair,

I'm opposed to the amendment as it has been proposed. I wanted to insert a conciliatory sub-amendment because there are challenges to the basic human rights in the Mediterranean. Just in case to, you know, turn it down, so to say, that "denial" may be too harsh of a word. But when we say "challenges" that means the challenges do exist, that violations do exist, but there are some positive things as well.

So I'm against this word "assistance" too because then the paragraph will not make any sense.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:13:46

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:13:49

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

So it is complicated because the Committee accepted the sub-amendment and then accepted the overall amendment in that context. So I do not have a clear position.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:13:59

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you. We will now proceed to vote on Amendment 12. The vote is open. The ballot is closed. Amendment number 12 is rejected.

We move on to amendment number 21, Mr KLEINWAECHTER.

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:14:30

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Well, paragraph 4.1 talks about place and rescue of men, women, and children in the Mediterranean above political and other considerations. Above all, we are an organisation that upholds the rule of law and, therefore, we also have to uphold democratic decisions and democracy. So, of course, you know, that will always be obliged to saving lives, but not in the sense that actually is portrayed in this report.

We demand that this passage is changed into: "upholding the rule of law and their democratic legal decisions and discuss their individual approaches on dealing with persons picked up in the Mediterranean Sea."

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:15:03

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Someone opposes the amendment? Mr HAJDUKOVIĆ?

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:15:08

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

This is the same issue, basically, as one of the amendments before.

When the ambulance comes to help someone in the street, will they apply an individual approach and ask "do you have a passport?" "What's your legal status?" "Where are you from?" "What's your country of origin?" "Is it a safe country?"

The person will die while it is concluded, so I'm against it. I'm against it because our obligation is to save lives.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:15:36

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:15:39

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:15:41

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Refuse.

We go to the vote. The poll is open. The poll is closed.

Amendment 21 is rejected.

We move on Amendment number 13.

Mrs YILDIZ.

Ms Zeynep YILDIZ

Turkey, NR 

11:16:05

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you Madam Chair.

By proposing this amendment we consider that the pushback actions do not only threaten refugees and migrants' lives, but also constitute a serious violation of the principle of non-refoulement as stated in the Geneva Convention. Therefore I think that it should be referred to in the draft resolution. Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:16:29

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Does anyone wish to oppose this amendment?

This is not the case.

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:16:37

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Accepted by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:16:39

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

Amendment number 13 is adopted.

Amendment number 14.

Ms YILDIZ.

Ms Zeynep YILDIZ

Turkey, NR 

11:17:01

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madame Chair.

Me and my colleagues believe that the report should also refer to the needs of most vulnerable refugees. Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:17:13

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

Someone opposes the amendment?

This is not the case.

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:17:19

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Accepted by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:17:21

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed. Amendment 14 is adopted.

Amendment number 1.

I call Mr MOUTQUIN to introduce it. I do not see him.

Does anyone wish to speak in support of Amendment No. 1?

The rapporteur.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:18:03

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you Madam Chair.

I'm in favour of this amendment since the LGBT+ group is often vulnerable due to their targeting by racist laws and actions in countries such as the death penalty in Pakistan and so on.

I think it is very important to clear this especially vulnerable group and single them out so I'm in favour.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:18:22

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:18:25

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Accepted by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:18:27

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

Amendment 1 is adopted.

We will move to Amendment number 22. If it passes, Amendment number 3 will fall.

Mr KLEINWAECHTER.

 

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:18:51

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you very much. We demand to delete paragraph 4.3. It demands a new European Union rescue mission and it is against the will of many many people to have rescue missions paid for by the taxpayer, with boats going out and actually collecting migrants.

To comment on your comparison with the ambulance: a German ambulance wouldn't go to the Czech Republic or to Russia to save anyone. It would save at home: an international sea is an international sea. Therefore this is not adequate, what you're demanding here.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:19:25

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you. Mr SCHENNACH wishes to speak against the amendment.

Mr Stefan SCHENNACH

Austria, SOC 

11:19:30

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

I'm absolutely against this amendment. This is an important duty that the EU and the member states have to do and it's completely in the spirit of this report, the spirit of the whole debate, we have to do it. Please don't accept this amendment.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:19:47

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:19:48

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:19:50

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

The amendment is rejected.

Amendment number 3, Mr MANIERO.

Mr Alvise MANIERO

Italy, NR 

11:20:13

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madame Chair.

Now, we all agree on the principle that NGOs and member states have to do their part, respectively. And we do all have to save lives, but repeating the same exact wording that we already have in paragraph 4 will not help us pass our thoughts through.

So please let's just avoid repetition so we don't give the impression we haven't actually read the document we are voting for.

Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:20:43

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

The Rapporteur of the Committee on Migration, Refugees and Displaced Persons was asked to take the following oral amendment: in the second sentence of paragraph 4.3, replace the words "not to let people perish in the Mediterranean" by the words "to adopt all necessary measures to save lives in the Mediterranean". I consider this moral amendment to be acceptable in light of the criteria of the regulation, but it can not be taken into account if at least 10 representatives and alternates oppose and rise. Are there any objections to taking this oral amendment into account?

Apparently, this is not the case. Therefore, we will first vote on Amendment number 3 and then, if necessary, if that happens, on the oral amendment.

Amendment number 3: Does anyone object to amendment number 3?

Mr Rapporteur.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:21:56

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madame Chair.

I think it is really important what the second sentence is saying, but I find the oral amendment acceptable. It would contribute to the report and that would avoid reiteration. So I would be in favour of the oral and amendment rather than this one.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:22:16

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

What is the opinion of the Committee on amendment number 3?

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:22:26

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We will go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

Amendment number 3 is adopted.

But in these circumstances, the oral amendment falls.

We will go to amendment number 23.

Mr KLEINWAECHTER has the floor.

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:23:03

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you very much.

Paragraph 4.7 talks about the implementation of the United Nations Global Compact on safe orderly and regular migration and refugees. Those are Global Compacts that, among other things, demand the abolishing of illegal and legal migration in favour of regular and irregular migration and such things. So it actually looks at levelling the differences between illegal and legal things. We don't want that — actually many countries in the Council of Europe that have not signed the Compact. It doesn't belong in here.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:23:41

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

Does anyone wish to speak against the amendment?

Mr HAJDUKOVIĆ.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:23:48

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

The United Nations Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration and on refugees is relevant to this context, especially relevant. Omitting it would render this paragraph's meaning, so I strongly urge not accept the amendment and to keep it in the text.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:24:05

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:24:07

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:24:09

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

The amendment is rejected.

We'll move on to amendment number 24. If it passes, amendment number 4 falls.

Mr KLEINWAECHTER, you have the floor.

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:24:37

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

Paragraph 4.8 calls to implement more efficient relocation, and it's not in the interest of many countries and peoples here in the Council of Europe to have a relocation of migrants on a large scale. So therefore this paragraph should be removed from the report.

Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:24:57

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you. Mr SCHENNACH against the amendment?

Mr Stefan SCHENNACH

Austria, SOC 

11:25:01

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What we need in Europe is solidarity, and that means that all countries have to stay together in solidarity: to help Greece, to help Malta, to help Spain and to help Italy. So and, there was the council of the minister of interior in Malta for a short time. This is what we have to do: we have to stay together and help each other.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:25:26

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:25:29

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:25:31

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

Amendment 24 is rejected. We'll go to amendment number 4.

Mr MANIERO.

Ms Sabrina DE CARLO

Italy, NR 

11:25:58

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madam President.

The Council of Europe and the European Union share the same fundamental values, which are at the heart of the Council of Europe's action. Among these we find first of all solidarity.

We therefore consider it important to state that the division of responsibilities must take place on the basis of reliable and effective solidarity.

Thanks.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:26:21

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

Does anyone wish to speak against Amendment 4?

This is not the case.

What is the opinion of the Committee?

 

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:26:29

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Accepted by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:26:32

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

Amendment number 4 is adopted.

Amendment number 11 and oral sub-amendment

To introduce Amendment number 11, I give the floor to Madam DE CARLO.

Ms Sabrina DE CARLO

Italy, NR 

11:27:05

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, President.

This passage was already contained in the original draft of the document. We know that a document was produced on 23 September, which is called Predictive Temporary Allocation Programme, which was adopted in Luxembourg a few days ago, so I think it is important to include this amendment to update the document.

Thanks.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:27:29

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

The Chair has received from the Committee an oral sub-amendment which I read: in paragraph 2 of Amendment 11, after the word "France", insert the words "from Finland". I consider this sub-amendment to be admissible under the criteria of the Rules of Procedure. As you know, it can not be taken into account if at least ten representatives stand up to oppose it.

Are there any objections to taking this oral sub-amendment into account?

This is not the case, so we will examine it.

I call the rapporteur to support the oral sub-amendment.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:28:12

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Yes, definitely, I'm in favour because as the honourable colleague said before me, it was already in the text. The old wording was different. This is a more precise wording and we need to laud all efforts that aim at reaching an agreement and responsibility sharing in Europe. So definitely in favour.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:28:29

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you. Does anyone wish to speak against the oral sub-amendment?

This is not the case. What is the opinion of the author of the amendment on the oral sub-amendment?

Ms DE CARLO.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:28:43

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

In favour. The Committee is naturally in favor.

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

The oral sub-amendment was adopted. We come back to the amendment. Does anyone wish to speak against the amendment, subamended?

This is not the case.

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:29:17

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Accepted by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:29:19

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote. The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

Amendment number 11 is adopted.

Amendment number 5. Amendment number 5 is the subject of a sub-amendment by the Committee. I call on Mr MANIERO to support Amendment number 5.

Mr Alvise MANIERO

Italy, NR 

11:29:51

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madam President.

While recognising the important role that NGOs have played in saving lives and in preparing the way forward for this work, we must call for compliance with international and national standards. This place is the cradle from which to defend human rights, democracy and the primacy of law. If rule of law still has any meaning and importance, we cannot avoid referring to the right to organise these operations.

Thanks.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:30:23

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

I consider this sub-amendment to be in order.

I received a sub-amendment from the Committee, which reads as follows: "in amendment 5, delete the words 'national deregulation'" and I consider this sub-amendment to be admissible in the light of the criteria of the regulation.

As you know, it can not be taken into account if at least 10 representatives stand up to oppose it.

Are there any objections to taking this oral sub-amendment into account? Such is not the case. So wait.

So the objections are in sufficient numbers, so we will not consider it, so we will deal with the amendment.

Does anyone wish to speak against Amendment number 5? Please, the Rapporteur.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:31:25

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madame Chair.

I must be against because there are too many national regulatory frameworks in the countries around the Mediterranean. Too many, and we don't know what they are. Maybe not all the captains know what they are. If we go by international law, that's something everyone knows, that's a universal thing. So I believe that international law is much better. Unfortunately, we can't debate this sub-amendment so I would be against this amendment.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:31:54

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, the opinion of the Committee ?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:31:56

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

So the Committee ruled on the clause as amended and accepted it, but in the Committee mind, it was a refusal now.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:32:05

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

Amendment number 5 is rejected.

Amendment number 25: Mr KLEINWAECHTER, you have the floor.

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:32:30

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you very much. We want to add paragraph 4.11, which is that the NGOs, if they help, should do so in cooperation with the coast guards of the coastal country. What is not acceptable, for example, the previously cited case of Carola Rackete, who illegally docked her ship, rammed a customs boat, and violated national law. This is not acceptable and that is not a humanitarian aid. The people in control of ships should not break any laws.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:32:59

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Mr SCHENNACH opposes the amendment.

Mr Stefan SCHENNACH

Austria, SOC 

11:33:04

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

I'm against, because we have to respect and be thankful for what the NGOs did in the last month and the last half year. If there were no NGOs, more, thousands, of people would have died, so we have to respect and don't accept this amendment please.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:33:22

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

The opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:33:25

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:33:27

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote. The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

The amendment is rejected.

Amendment number 26, Mr KLEINWAECHTER.

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:33:49

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Ms President. 

The amendment is to cut off after the passage in the nearest port of safety as provided for by International Maritime Law. And that's exactly the point, there are the Amnesty guidelines for rescue at sea that regulate very clearly when someone is in safety and when he's not in safety, and what to do with refugees.

It's especially in article 6.14, I invite you to read this document, which is already international law, so we don't need the text following this passage and it should be deleted. 

Thank you. 

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:34:21

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you. Someone opposes the amendment?

Mr Rapporteur?

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:34:27

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Well, I must be against it because the mentioned aspects are required both under international law and EU law, so I don't see any harm in them being left in the report. So I urge you not to accept this amendment.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:34:40

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:34:42

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:34:44

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote. The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

Amendment 26 is rejected.

Amendment number 6. I give the floor to Ms DE CARLO to support it.

Ms Sabrina DE CARLO

Italy, NR 

11:35:07

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Madam President.

We consider it very important to include this passage in the text because it refers exactly to the document we were talking about earlier, the one prepared during the meeting in Malta, which establishes the voluntary rotation of the landing ports and the redistribution of migrants on a mandatory basis , with a quota system that will be set according to the number of countries participating in the agreement.

Thanks.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:35:34

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Does anyone wish to speak against the amendment?

Mr Rapporteur.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:35:40

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

I have to be against it because the international law requires disembarkation in the closest safe port. It makes no sense to ship migrants to ports which are far away. So, for example if someone is rescued off the coast of Malta, they can be disembarked in Dublin or Riga or Talinn or Stockholm. It doesn't make any sense. After they are rescued, after this disembarkation has been completed, relocation can be pursued under other agreements.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:36:07

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, what is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:36:09

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:36:10

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

The amendment is rejected.

Amendment number 27. If adopted, Amendment number 15 will fall.

Mr Norbert KLEINWAECHTER

Germany, NR 

11:36:33

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you, Ms President.

We want to delete paragraph 4.13 which asks for resettlement programmes. In our view, the best way to end the dying in the Mediterranean Sea is actually by treating everyone the same way, no matter what vessel he takes. People who come by plane or by regular ferry, they are refused because, well, they're not really refugees. But if they come on an illegal vessel, they are received. And that is actually the mistake we have to correct — its nowhere in the report — but the approach to just make resettlement programmes will just lead in the opposite direction.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:37:08

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you.

I call Mr SCHENNACH against the amendment.

Mr Stefan SCHENNACH

Austria, SOC 

11:37:12

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Sorry this is a very cynical interpretation.

What we said before, what we had in the debate, what we need is European solidarity. What we need is a relocation programme inside the European Union. That is what we have to offer. It's totally not necessary to think whether people are coming with an NGO or on an official vessel, the important thing is to welcome, as the rapporteur said, in the next safe harbour.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:37:46

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

What is the opinion of the Committee?

Mr Pierre-Alain FRIDEZ

Switzerland, SOC 

11:37:48

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Rejected by a large majority.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:37:50

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

We go to the vote.

The poll is open.

The ballot is closed.

Amendment 27 is rejected.

Amendment number 15. I call Mr SIRAKAYA to introduce it.

Mr Zafer SIRAKAYA

Turkey, NR 

11:38:19

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you Madam Chair.

The reason why me and my colleagues offered this amendment is that the EU should be called on to activate a voluntary humanitarian admission scheme, which would contribute to the resettlement. Thank you.

Ms Liliane MAURY PASQUIER

Switzerland, SOC, President of the Assembly 

11:38:41

Video EN | OV
Print intervention

Thank you,

Does anyone wish to speak against the amendment?

Mr rapporteur.

Mr Domagoj HAJDUKOVIĆ

Croatia, SOC, Rapporteur 

11:38:48